Archive for extraterrestrials

The Legends of Turnbull Canyon

Posted in Urban Legend with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2015 by Xander Woolf

Canyon

Turnbull Canyon is located in Southern California, creating the border between the towns of Wittier and City of Industry (yes, that’s the actual name of the town). It is a popular attraction for hikers and fitness nuts with it’s tough but manageable trails and beautiful scenery. According to locals, however, this canyon is the setting of many a terrifying event. Legend has it that not only is the canyon haunted, but it is also the preferred location for dark magic rituals, human sacrifices, and several grizzly murders. In this post, I will detail as many of the horrific events as I can.

Called “Hutukngna” by the Gabrileños Native Americans, this nature formation was considered off limits as there were numerous sightings of ghosts and evil spirits. It is believed that Turnbull Canyon was the battleground of many Native American Wars. Some locals have claimed that they have heard the sound of war drums coming from the canyon.

This tribe of Native Americans was so named the Gabrileños after converting to Christianity through the San Gabriel Mission. Back in this time, it was not uncommon that Spanish missionaries would kill those who refused to convert. Legend has it that many of these killings took place in the canyon itself. The idea that the spirits of these murdered Natives have lingered lends credence to the belief that the canyon is haunted.

Fast forward to the 1930s. During the Great Depression, the canyon was used for dark and mysterious purposes. Back in that time, it was common for families to send their children to orphanages because they simply did not have the food to feed them. Local legend says that a cult would adopt the children through these orphanages and sacrifice them to Satan in the canyon. Locals have claimed to see the ghosts of these children, as well as hooded figures walking the trails at night. These sightings still occur today.

Within Turnbull Canyon, there is a tree referred to as The Hanging Tree. It is so named because of a man who was found hanging from one of its limbs. Witnesses have said that you can still see this man hanging from the tree at the time of his death. There is no information as to what time of day this might have occurred. I also have no information as to when in history this might have taken place.

In 1952, there was a plane crash, causing 29 deaths, 21 of which were children. An American Airlines plane crashed into the tallest hill of the canyon. There is no record of an American Airlines flight in that area at all and no planes were missing from their fleet. No one on board had identification, including the pilot. The only record of the crash even happening was a small article in the Wittier Daily News. Locals believe that the dark magic that lingers in the canyon caused this horrifying crash to happen.

In 1962, a bizarre death took place. In the ruins of a mental institution that had burned down in the 1940s, a group of teenagers were having a party. One of the boys found an old electroshock machine. When he picked it up, he was electrocuted with a voltage strong enough to be fatal. The bizarre part of the death comes when we find out that the electricity had been shut off after the fire 20 years previously.

In 2002, a young woman by the name of Gloria Gaxiola was murdered on Turnbull Canyon Rd. She was shot, then dragged behind a car down this road for 5 miles. The police caught the killers and administered justice. Being a popular road for racing, there have been other unfortunate auto-related deaths, including that of a CHP motorcycle Officer in Sept. 2005, who was struck by drifters.

Believe it or not, there are even more stories associated with this terrifying location. Located just an hour or so outside of Los Angeles, Turnbull canyon is one of the scariest places I’ve ever researched. Home to ghosts, evil spirits, cults, and other strange occurrences, this canyon just screams “Stay Away!” So, naturally, I want to go there.

wolfout

Sources:
Weird California
Haunted Los Angeles Blogspot
DBLACKTHORNE Livejournal

Photo Source:
Yelp

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Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

Posted in Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 4, 2015 by Lilliandra Winters

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

Director: Philip Kaufman
Starring: Donald Sutherland, Brooke Adams, Jeff Goldblum, Leonard Nimoy
Currently on Rotten Tomatoes’ Top 100 Horror Movie List
I vaguely recall watching this movie when I was much younger and I remember being overcome with the same feeling. Overwhelming disinterest.

Don’t worry. I can already hear you booing and hissing from here.

Listen, I love the concept. I find the idea very interesting, but this is one of those movies that didn’t translate very well for me. If you read my previous review of The Exorcist, I go into how some movies, as wonderful as they may be, just don’t translate without a sense of nostalgia attached to it. Invasion of the Body Snatchers is by far the opposite end of that for me.

Donald Sutherland has always been an amazing actor; Brooke Adams was a bit touch and go for me; and Jeff Goldblum is stalking me on this project, I swear. I expect him to pop up again soon. So, the acting wasn’t the issue. The story was a bit erratic, I felt, but I tried to chalk that up to writing about hysteria. It isn’t easy to convey hysteria properly, as it most often comes off as confusion or idiocy.

Of course, the old nature of the movie combined with the special effects and the fact that I wasn’t alive in the 70s made it harder to relate to their ‘daily life.’ None of these factors helped me. In fact, I consider them all great hindrances.

So, here is where I am going to confuse you. It wasn’t a bad movie. I liked it. I didn’t love it; I won’t rave about it; but I liked it. There are several moments that were very worthy of undivided attention and I rather agreed with the ending and applaud the character, Matthew Bennell (Sutherland), for his response to the situation. Many of you may not agree with that, but, honestly, what more could he have done?

It’s on the list for a reason, so I recommend you watch it and form your own opinion. It was a tad heart-breaking seeing Leonard Nimoy appear on the screen, but also oddly wonderful.

Moral of the story? How well do you know your friends and family? Could you tell if they’ve been taken over by pod people?

WintersOver4

The Legend of The Black-Eyed Kids

Posted in Urban Legend with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 26, 2015 by Xander Woolf

The legend of the Black-Eyed Children tells of paranormal creatures that resemble children with pale skin and black eyes. These creatures are usually seen hitchhiking, panhandling or just standing on the doorsteps of residential homes. These children are usually asking for help, a ride home or to be let inside out of the cold.

Those who have reported encounters with the Black-Eyed Kids (BEKs) often describe a feeling of danger or dread. They report that the BEKs feel supernatural and unsafe, though they can never explain why.

In the encounters, they usually appear in pairs, are confident, yet avoid eye-contact, and keep their faces turned down. It is also said that they speak with a maturity far beyond their age. Not only do these children possess the mannerisms and speech patters of adults, but they also sometimes possess the voice of an adult.

All reports of BEKs have the same thing in common: these Black-Eyed Kids and their requests for help create an unsettling sense of danger in the adults with whom they speak. Some people even believe that the children may use low-level mind control to try to get their victims to comply with their demands.

Many people believe that the BEKs are spirits of lost or murdered children that are the “harbingers of ill will and personal doom.” Many others believe that they are vampires, as it does appear that they cannot enter a house or vehicle without the owner’s permission. Some even believe that they are extraterrestrials trying to blend into society.

There are no accounts as to what happens should one actually let a BEK into their home or car, which could possibly mean that those who do are killed.

Would you help a BEK in need?